C17 (Classic 17) in London

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Lucky_Louis
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Post by Lucky_Louis »

Great looking work and pictures Wobbly =D> . Sounds like we are the same stage, I'm building my OB17 outside and did the tape and hull glass last weekend. Question for you - why did you stop taping the corners half way up the transom? That whole joint is highly stressed by the engine weight and stresses. Maybe check your scantlings or with Jacques before applying the skin glass.

cheers, Lou



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Post by jacquesmm »

Good looking job but what was the problem with wetting out the fiberglass? Does it stay white? In that case, it may be the binder. Not all types of glass are compatible with epoxy.
Normally, the fiberglass should become transparent in a few minutes if not seconds.
From the pictures, it looks OK now.
Jacques Mertens - Designer
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WobblyLegs
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Post by WobblyLegs »

jacquesmm wrote:Good looking job but what was the problem with wetting out the fiberglass? Does it stay white? In that case, it may be the binder. Not all types of glass are compatible with epoxy.
Normally, the fiberglass should become transparent in a few minutes if not seconds.
From the pictures, it looks OK now.
Hi Jacques,

The glass does go transparent quite quickly, but it took more epoxy than I expected. The problem I had was trying to eliminate all the air bubbles that formed between the weave and it took a lot of repetative squeezing with the squeegee to make sure all the air was expelled.

Regards,

Tim.

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Post by WobblyLegs »

Lucky_Louis wrote:Question for you - why did you stop taping the corners half way up the transom?

cheers, Lou
Good question Lou - one reason is that with the upper side panels in place I cannot reach the middle of the boat when standing on my little stepladder. Also, I wouldn't be able to work underneath the boat as I wouldn't have enough space to get in - most of my tools and materials are stored underneath.

I'm not concerned about strength as on the coners of the transom (and the bow) the tape goes all the way to the top of the lower side panels. When the uppers side panels are put in place, I will be doing more tape all along that corner, so in effect each corner will end up being a glass-wood-glass-wood-glass laminate for the middle six inches or so (the overlap of the two side panels).

Keep well,

T

glcost
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Post by glcost »

The hull is looking very nice Wobbly. I like your fabric cutter too; my wife uses one of those for quilting.

On my boatbuilding project last year, I made the mistake of borrowing my wife's sewing scissors. My old shop pair were too dull to cut the FG. She was so pissed at me when she found out. You obviously have better sense then I do.

George
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Post by ArizonaBuilder »

I have to say, I really don't like working with large amounts of epoxy. It's easy enough to spread on a horizontal surface, but on vertical surfaces?
When taping, some wet the tape out on a separate table and then put the wetted out tape down on the seams. It is a lot easier then wetting out the tape on the seam.

For a table, I simply use my 12 quart cooler lid. I have put a layer of poly plastic sheeting on the lid. The cured epoxy just peels off as a thin film the next time I am doing a taping session. It is a quick and easy way to tape and the tape has the right amount of epoxy.
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BillTwo
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Not Meeting Schedule

Post by BillTwo »

WobblyLegs wrote:Okay, so things didn't really go to schedule.

I have to say, I really don't like working with large amounts of epoxy. It's easy enough to spread on a horizontal surface, but on vertical surfaces? Grrr. As you can see from my transom pic (below), it drips all over the place. And sticks to everything. And once it gets on the gloves and squeegee everthing gets all slippery and slimy. And my hands still feel sticky now, even though I only got a little bit of epoxy on them.

Keep building guys... (BOD's)

Wobbly.
Wobbly, your work is still looking good. I shouldn't worry about staying on schedule. Schedules are nothing but references in time as to when you would like for a particular event(s) to occur. The main focus, as I'm sure you are already doing, is detailing and maintaining a good quality of work which you are currently doing.

When I was uploading more pictures to my gallery "OB17 Building Phase", I came across your recent gallery input and saw this strange looking tool with the orange wheel. Now I can rest easy since you explained what it is. I'm always on the look-out for new tools and better ways of doing things.

Finally a word of CAUTION, you mentioned that you "got a little bit of epoxy on" your hands. A little is too much. If you should happen to have that occur again, immediately clean it off with "white Vinegar". This is what I've read in various books and manuals as I'm sure that you have.

I've just now received my Pre-cut Plywood and will begin today cutting out the pre-cut patterns.

Keep up the good work and BOD =D>

Regards,

Billtwo :-k

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Post by jasonmcintosh »

Wobbly,

Just wanted to say that it looks like you're doing a fantasic job. The hull looks great. Hope things keep going well for you.

Jason
Hopefully fishing from my GF18

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JimW
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Post by JimW »

Looks Great!
Jim Wright
CC, D15, SC16, C19

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Post by WobblyLegs »

Well, it's been a while since the last update, and things have been progressing slowly.

I think, though, that I'm over the main epoxy hump, that is covering the hull (I know the inside still has to be done, but at least that doesn't have to be fair!).

Since the last update, the weather has really been playing havoc, as for a couple of weeks it seemed to rain every afternoon so I couldn't work in the evenings, and then a couple of weekends too (not as bad as it seems some of you guys in Florida seem to be experiencing, from what I hear).

Anyway, summer seems to have well and truly arrived, so last weekend I managed to sand all the taped seems in preparation for the final lamination, then during the week I measured out the upper side panels (not cut yet).

Then, this weekend I finally bit the bullet and laid the cloth over the boat.

I eventually decided to go "wet on dry" as people here seem to refer to it. Laid down the cloth on the starboard side, positioned it and got on with mixing. Starting at the transom, I just poured the whole lot on the cloth at the centre-line over a distance of about 0.5m (1.5'). As this started to run down towards the chine, I very lightly and without trying to force the epoxy into the cloth, used a squeegee to spread the epoxy over the first area, then went to mix a second pot of goo.

Image

By the time the second mix was ready, I was able to pour on to the cloth again, just below halfway between the centre and the chine, and the first pouring was soaked into the cloth enough to squeeze the air out. After spreading about three areas like this, I had my routine going pretty well.

The port side took about two and a half hours to lay. By now I was on a roll, but it was getting really hot and I was contemplating delaying the second half. But, a half hour break, and nearly two litres of water later, decided it had to go on.

The second (port) side took only one and a half hours to do, working with a nice method:
- Mix one pot, pour at centre and spread towards me (chine) lightly.
- Mix another pot, pour 2/3 of it closer to chine, spread lightly.
- Squeeze first mix to get air out.
- Pour half of remaining mix onto overlap on starboard side and spread lightly.
- Squeeze second batch on the bottom.
- Spread remaining epoxy onto the glass on the side lightly.
- Squeeze starboard side overlap.
- Squeeze side.
- Start again one step closer to the bow.

Image

Measuring and mixing was made easy by having pumps in the resin and hardener that pump proportionally so each pot was four pumps resin, four pumps hardener (about 150ml/5oz). It also helped that the resin had warmed up quite a lot, so was thinner and easier to spread than the first half.

Of course, working in hot conditions did cause a little bit of out-gassing from the wood, but I was able to squeeze almost all of it down again. There are a few very small patches where air got caught under the glass, but looking at it this morning I will be able to grind a small area with a Dremel and squeeze some epoxy into that. Also, having already done the centre and chines, obviously no air could come out there and I have ended up with one very strong looking hull.

It really does look nice now, and as Mrs Wobbly said when looking at the dark wood through the glass, it seems a shame to paint it. I think I have now decided that I am going to try and keep the entire topside natural wood if I can get all the joints neat enough.

Also, I ordered all the wood that I need for the hull trimmings - keel, strakes, spray rail, rub rail laminations - which will be cut to shape (strakes and spray rail) and delivered on Saturday. This week I plan on filling the weave on the bottom in preparation for fairing and hopefully I'll be able to join the keel (skeg?) and spray rails on the weekend.

I shall let you know how I get on (hopefully things will start moving quicker again).

As usual, more pics here:
http://gallery.bateau2.com/thumbnails.p ... 286&page=6

Oh, and I've just noticed that the gallery pics seem a bit out of order, but I'm sure JM will sort that out...

Wobb.
Last edited by WobblyLegs on Wed Jul 20, 2005 5:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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