1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Questions about boat repairs with our resins and fiberglass: hull patches, transoms and stringers, foam, rot etc.
fallguy1000
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by fallguy1000 »

It all depends on how thick it 'needs to be to have bond throughout. But I'd prefer to use more pb to less. If it is really flat, you can also neatcoat each side first, wait an hour for it to tack and then apply the pb. The hotcoating is sort of the magic. What you don't want is for the wood to suck the resins out. I have seen it happen on a few of my works where I didn't expect it. Old wood is especially notorious for drysuck. My redwood ceiling timbers I tested to see what they did to resin and they were really bad suck-ers and all required slathering with epoxy before the pb.

I'd aim for 1/8" vee trowel on one side or 1/16" for both if real flat. If not real flat, 1/8" both sides is a shit ton of material, but the transom is small. If you go that much, use a lot of angle and pressure on the passes to reduce it some and not a lot of pressure after she's stuck. Jist enough to ooze the edges.

If the skin of the hull feels like it is flexing too much; consider laying some 1708 in the bottom. But if it stiffens with the stringers; that'll do. Just think about what it does pounding a wave.


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goingbogueoutdoors
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by goingbogueoutdoors »

fallguy1000 wrote: Thu May 12, 2022 6:35 am It all depends on how thick it 'needs to be to have bond throughout. But I'd prefer to use more pb to less. If it is really flat, you can also neatcoat each side first, wait an hour for it to tack and then apply the pb. The hotcoating is sort of the magic. What you don't want is for the wood to suck the resins out. I have seen it happen on a few of my works where I didn't expect it. Old wood is especially notorious for drysuck. My redwood ceiling timbers I tested to see what they did to resin and they were really bad suck-ers and all required slathering with epoxy before the pb.

I'd aim for 1/8" vee trowel on one side or 1/16" for both if real flat. If not real flat, 1/8" both sides is a shit ton of material, but the transom is small. If you go that much, use a lot of angle and pressure on the passes to reduce it some and not a lot of pressure after she's stuck. Jist enough to ooze the edges.

If the skin of the hull feels like it is flexing too much; consider laying some 1708 in the bottom. But if it stiffens with the stringers; that'll do. Just think about what it does pounding a wave.
Thanks FG for the advice! I’ve noticed, as others have pointed out, that the fir definitely absorbs a good bit of epoxy. I’ve light coated each section so far (butt blocks, transom) and have then used thickened epoxy as it tacks up. Weather has been favorable to be using fast hardener here in Morehead City (been in the 50’s, unbelievable).

Going to mix a healthy batch and use your advice. Planning to utilize smaller wax coated screws with large washers in the 4 engine mount holes, as well as the drain plug area to help clamp in a uniform manner. I personally would rather wait until the transom is glasses to drill these areas out for the appropriate hardware.

The hull blocked up feels pretty good considering she’s empty. The area forward of the transom is ground down to the bare hull skin and plan to have 2 layers of 1708 in this area (bilge and seachests).

goingbogueoutdoors
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by goingbogueoutdoors »

As predicted took a good bit of thickened to fill the gap bur happy with it. Going to have to inject slow in the bottom but as per the tutorials and read ups I have seen this seems to be the norm. Three clamps up top and half a dozen fasteners thru the back
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E409FB27-A994-49E8-A422-86EA34E400C7.jpeg

fallguy1000
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by fallguy1000 »

Pull the screws at 12-16 hours. Would have been smart to router those three sides for glass. You want to glass over the top here as well... You can form radiuses with a festool sander and 40 grit as well.
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goingbogueoutdoors
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by goingbogueoutdoors »

fallguy1000 wrote: Thu May 12, 2022 3:25 pm Pull the screws at 12-16 hours. Would have been smart to router those three sides for glass. You want to glass over the top here as well... You can form radiuses with a festool sander and 40 grit as well.
I’ll definitely be forming around the mating edge of the well on both sides and the three edges that will need to be glassed. I know forming heavy 1708 can be a pain. Open to suggestions on other options.

Tabbing will be done with 12oz biax on the bottom and assuming the sides of the well? I havent seen or done a transom on a well boat so kind of going with what I think is correct. Learn by doing is my way, I’m humble enough to make mistakes along the way and am thankful for all you experts chiming in.

fallguy1000
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by fallguy1000 »

Yeah, tab sides and bottom. Something like 3-4 layers of 1708, longest layer first, maybe 10,8,6,4"...or 12,10,8,6" pieces. Longest first is better quality and less sand thru
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fallguy1000
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by fallguy1000 »

You MUST tab overtops, both sides, same, something like +8,+6,+4,+2 each side, so for a 2" top, the plus 8 is an 18" piece, etc,

Not closing the top will result in the top splitting open from cte variation. Seen it here a few times.

If you go overtops, you must grind away old gelcoat down to bare glass. It won't be fun, but must be done,
My boat build is here -------->

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goingbogueoutdoors
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by goingbogueoutdoors »

fallguy1000 wrote: Fri May 13, 2022 10:17 am You MUST tab overtops, both sides, same, something like +8,+6,+4,+2 each side, so for a 2" top, the plus 8 is an 18" piece, etc,

Not closing the top will result in the top splitting open from cte variation. Seen it here a few times.

If you go overtops, you must grind away old gelcoat down to bare glass. It won't be fun, but must be done,
No stranger to grinding anymore. So over the backside (where engine mounts) I should sand/grind that skin away to l build back up with my overlapping layers. Copy

fallguy1000
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by fallguy1000 »

You are gonna have a great boat when done because you are making these efforts.
My boat build is here -------->

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goingbogueoutdoors
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Re: 1986 19' Atlantic rebuild

Post by goingbogueoutdoors »

fallguy1000 wrote: Sat May 14, 2022 9:07 am You are gonna have a great boat when done because you are making these efforts.
I hope so! This one will be sentimental for sure. I’ll be very prideful that first ride on a boat I rebuilt, powered by a motor I rebuilt.

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